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Commonwood Exploration Well Dart Energy Appeal Consultaion
Posted By Luke Ashley
Dear supporters and signators,

As you should already know, in a rare event, an application to drill a test borehole to test for gas content in the coal seams that lie beneath the countryside on the outskirts of Wrexham in North Wales was refused recently by the Wrexham County Borough Council.

With your help and with the help of local people on the ground who filled the public gallery during the day of the decision, we were able to persuade the planning committee members to cast a majority vote in opposition to the proposals by Dart Energy.

I, again, thank each and every one of you for all you have done in helping to make Wrexham a `Frack Free` zone.

However. The battle is not over yet because, as expected, Dart have launched an appeal and as this petition played a significant role in the Council`s decision to refuse planning, It is my duty to now inform you about the appeal and the consultation process.

Planning Reference: P 2013 0660

Welsh Assembly Government Ref: H6955/A/14/2218276

Site Address: PART OF FIELD WEST OF COMMONWOOD FARM AND SOUTH OF BORRAS ROAD COMMONWOOD HOLT WREXHAM

Site Description: DRILLING OF EXPLORATION BOREHOLE (REQUIRING 24 HOUR OPERATIONS) TO REMOVE A CORE OF COAL FOR SAMPLING AND SITE RESTORATION FOLLOWING CESSATION OF DRILLING OPERATIONS. DRILLING OPERATIONS TO TAKE APPROXIMATELY 60 DAYS AND A MAXIMUM OF 75 DAYS

The appeal has been made to the Welsh Ministers in respect of the above-mentioned site. The appeal follows Wrexham Council’s determination of the application. The appeal is to be decided on the basis of Written Representations. As an interested party/neighbouring occupier, you may wish to make representations in connection with this appeal to The Planning Inspectorate. Any comments from consultees following the original application for permission (unless they are expressly confidential), will be forwarded to the Planning Inspectorate and copied to the appellant and will be taken into account by the Inspector in deciding the appeal. If you wish to make any additional comments you should complete the enclosed ‘Comments on Case’ form, within six weeks of the start date.

Start Date: 01/07/2014

If any representations are submitted after the deadline, they will not be seen by the Inspector and they will be returned. The address for The Planning Inspectorate is:-

The Planning Inspectorate Crown Buildings Cathays Park Cardiff CF10 3NQ

Alternatively you may make your comments by e-mail to: wales@pins.gsi.gov.uk or visit www.planningportal.gov.uk where you may view the appeal documents. Alternatively you may visit the Planning Department to view the documents. Please note if you wish to receive a copy of the appeal decision you should request one in writing from the Planning Inspectorate.



Go to the Planning Portal . After typing this reference number APP/H6955/A/14/2218276 into the "search for a case section",
(it's worth checking you're in the Welsh site of the Portal - there should be a drop down menu on the top right hand page of the home screen to allow you to enter the Welsh site),
it should bring up "case summary".
You will see on this page a green box which outlines the relevant dates for the submission of evidence. Below that box if a sub-hearing called "documents".
If you click on the "here" option, it will take you to a page called "view documents for....". All documents will be contained here.

I can confirm that the Welsh Government have concluded its EIA Screening exercise and has determined that an EIA is not required for the proposed direction.

So PLEASE everyone, let`s continue to show our opposition to these plans by sending in our objections.
May I remind you that due to the wording of this petition and although it has already been submitted as part of an objection to the planning committee, the petition is ongoing and can be resubmitted at any time in the future or until an outright ban has been imposed in the North East Wales area.
IT IS IMPORTANT to keep sharing this petition
https://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/stop-fracking-wrexham-county-borough-council
and gaining more signatures. It made a huge difference during the original decision making, and if we can quadruple our total to date, we are sure to influence the Welsh Planning Inspectorate`s decision too.
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A WORD OF WARNING
Posted By ray mitchell
BORDER RETAIL PARK..we went shopping into wrexham a couple of weeks ago and parked on the border retail car park as we intended to go around the shops ,so we nipped into tesco's prior to get a few groceries ,we we're about 30 mins and by the time we had returned to the car to put the groceries in it before continuing to shop in the other shops we had a £60 parking ticket slapped on the windscreen, with the reason for issuing the ticket was that we had left the site.to cut a long story short we appealed against it and WON! these people just seem to think they can slap a ticket on ones car and expect you to cough up WRONG!!! so if anyone else gets a ticket fight it.or even better still don't park on the border retail park ... you might end up being ticketed!!!!
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Gas drilling plans near Common Wood, Borras Head, Wrexham
Posted By Luke Ashley
Hi,
I`m the founder member of the N.E. Wales anti-fracking action network based in Borras, Wrexham, where I`ve lived for the last 20 years.

I`ve created this thread to not only let local residents know about the new planning application that was lodged on the 20`th September with WCBC by GP Energy who propose to drill an exploration well to test for gas content within the coal seams below the Borras Head area of Wrexham, but also to try and PROPERLY inform people about the impacts and implications that surround exploitation of unconventional gas resources should this planning and future applications be approved.

But first, a little about myself and how I came to be in strong opposition to any such developments.
Three years ago, while doing some unrelated on-line research, I stumbled upon the news headline, "Onshore drilling about to hit UK shores from America".
Being an ex North Sea drill crew worker back in the mid 80`s where I gained about seven years experience working with several different companies on various types of exploration rigs and production platforms, I became quite excited about the fact that I could be working on a land rig nearer to home.
I found out quite quickly that there were Petroleum Exploration and Development License (PEDL) blocks stretching from Wrexham to Chester which at that time, Composite Energy held but who are now owned by Dart Energy of which GP Energy are a subsidiary of.
It was starting to feel like a dream come true for me. I could have done with some highly paid work once again to pay off my debts and to help me achieve my ambitions of buying a smallholding to live a self sufficient way of life for the rest of my years. But there was one thing I needed to read up more about if I was to have any success in landing that dream job. These drilling plans included a process I was not familiar with, `Hydraulic Fracturing`. So for the following weeks that turned into months, my google researching into this new process kept on turning up the word `Controversial`.
The more I looked, trying to convince myself there was nothing to be concerned about, ( I REALLY wanted that job) the more difficult it became to ignore the possibility that I may be applying for work that could potentially destroy the countryside and very life I was dreaming about setting up for myself (and family) in my later years and into retirement.
Being a Facebook user and having some 1000 odd like-minded friends all over the world, I set about making enquiries. My first port of call was America, the birth place of Fracking. Within literally minutes of my initial enquiries, I was able to chat with people who were being directly impacted by the onslaught of the shale gas rush across many parts of America. I was hearing first hand accounts of water contamination, land grabs, industrialisation of the countryside, illegal dumping of toxic frack waste-water into rivers and road verges, drilling rig blow-outs, fires and explosions, people and animals falling sick near drilling sites, increase in noisy heavy goods vehicles tearing up quiet country roads, gas leaks, noise and air pollution coming from drill sites and compressor stations, trenches being dug across farmlands for the new pipelines, health complaints from communities living near silica sand mines, (silica sand is used to mix with water and chemicals to pump at high pressure into the newly fractured rock formations) , aquifers quickly depleting due to the high demand of fresh water by the fracking companies, radiation alarm systems going off at landfill and waste water treatment sites due to the high levels of Radon found in the drill cuttings and returned fracking fluid,.......
I could go on and on but just wanted to highlight some of the main concerns people are having in America. After a little more digging I realised all this was happening due to the very poor regulations in the US. Regulations that were especially adapted to exclude the clean air and water acts. Regulations that allowed a loophole that enabled the fracking companies to keep secret the chemicals they were using to pump into the ground to shatter it.
But things would be better here in the UK, I thought. Having worked in the North Sea, I was often told by supervisors that the UK had one of the most heavily regulated oil and gas industries in the world. Most of my work mates disagreed and so did I on many occasions, which is probably why safety representatives were introduced into the industry during my career, one of which was me.
So I set about looking into what regulations were in place regarding onshore drilling and was shocked to find that the same rules and regulations applied for onshore as they did offshore and with no recommendations or guidance notes relating to hydraulic fracturing. In fact I found the two pages worth of regulations that were supposedly for onshore exploration and extraction of hydrocarbons to be very poorly and hastily written, totally inadequate and not worth the paper they were written on due to the fact that in reality, drilling companies were given the power to regulate themselves under the guidance from DECC.
So this led me to investigate how well these companies carry out self regulation and in particular, Dart Energy, as they were the ones likely to be drilling in the North East Wales area. To do this, I had to travel (via facebook) to Australia where Dart were heavily involved with coal bed methane exploration and extraction. Again, I was faced with very disturbing stories of much the same impacts and concerns that the Americans were faced with and that a rapidly growing and well informed movement of concerned citizens were taking action against the likes of Dart which has recently resulted Dart selling off their Australian assets to focus on their UK portfolio.
Due to our extremist right wing politicians in power in the UK, drilling companies have been given tax incentives and may also enjoy increased acreage by way of the 14`th Licensing round which is scheduled to be announced later this year or early next year. If our Government could have their way, they would like to include shale gas and CBM exploitation into the Infrastructure Bill thus enabling them to ensure the frackers have the right to drill anywhere they like throughout England, Scotland, N.Ireland and Wales without the consent of local council planners or the communities they work for.
Once you have done as much research as I have, you begin to realise that certain key figures in Government have interests in the energy sector, especially the fossil fuel industry and you can start to connect the dots between Banks, investment companies and Politicians.
At the end of the day, the `Dash for Gas` is actually a dash for cash and if you`ve done your homework properly, all roads lead back to Central Government.
As a Welsh citizen, I for one, am strongly opposed to foreign companies, funded by foreign investors, taking advantage of tax incentives and inadequate regulations provided by our corrupt political leaders, in order to plunder Welsh resources which severely impact the health and well-being of local communities, industrialising our countryside and putting at risk our water supplies, soils, environment and eco systems, air quality and livelihoods while expecting us to pay more for our energy.

I`ve been researching fracking and the much wider picture for 3 years now and needless to say, I have no intention of EVER looking for future employment within the industry.
But that`s only because i`ve taken the time to do my OWN research. And by the way, I`m not an environmentalist, eco-warrior, Green Party member, conspiracy theorist or affiliated with any NGO`s like Greenpeace or Friends of the Earth. I`m just an ordinary concerned, and now, well informed citizen who in light of all the research I have done, feels compelled to properly inform others who may be in the firing line.

Central Government are doing all they can to try and push through this dash for gas. All I ask local people to do is to push them back and allow yourselves the time to properly assess the impacts by learning from people such as myself and/or doing your own research before allowing something which you may later regret or that your children and grandchildren wished you had put a stop to.

If anyone has read this far and wants to learn more or wants to get involved with an opposition group, please let me know here. Or if you are a Facebook user, come along to my page and to find out more. Alternatively, drop me an email @ lashley40@aol.com
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Dart Energy (confirmed) public exhibitions.
Posted By Luke Ashley
Monday 25th 16:00 to 21:00 “Training Room” Acton Community Resource Centre, Acton

Tuesday 26th 14:00 to 20:00 Kenyon Hall, Holt

Wednesday 27th 14:00 to 20:00 “Green Room” Gresford Memorial Hall, Gresford
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Re: Gas drilling plans near Common Wood, Borras Head, Wrexham
Posted By Luke Ashley
DART ENERGY

Would like to invite you to

A PUBLIC EXHIBITION

at

Gresford Memorial Hall

Wednesday 27 November
Between 2pm and 8pm

Concerning the Proposed Coal Bed Methane Well
South of Borras Road

Usual tactics from the frackers. Sending out invitation cards by post. Only doing the bare minimum you are obliged to do to inform the public of your plans. This should be in every local rag in the county, but if it WAS, you would get a lot of angry and unmanageable members of the public turning up would`nt you? The smaller the crowd, the easier it is to manipulate them with your `sound-bites`.
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Re: Gas drilling plans near Common Wood, Borras Head, Wrexham
Posted By Luke Ashley
Thank you for your response.
As to what you say in private and public being the same is not true and will be revealed in a press release at a time that suits us and our aims.
It is our view that the Dart spokesmen have made a very serious error and when this mistake comes to light in the press release, it will be very damaging for Dart Energy who have an already tarnished reputation.

As for regulation in this country. It is common knowledge that the Government is trying to do what they can to water down the already weak regulations, cutting funding is just one such latest move. It is also common knowledge that the industry is pretty much self regulated.

I have no intention of sitting down in private with you to listen to your pro industry`sound-bites` and/or your efforts to prevent me revealing to the wider public what your spokespersons said to an individual in private.
On the subject of what you are planning to do after Holt-1 ,.. you give the impression you are open and providing information, yet you are very vague. Do you plan to re-enter Holt-1 or do you plan to drill another well from another well site? From the knowledge I`ve gained over the last 3 or so years on the subject of unconventional gas exploitation, one vertical well is used as a production well (Holt-1) and from another well pad several hundred metres away, another well is drilled (SIS wells)from where many more wells are drilled from the same borehole which intersect the production well. This process is repeated every couple of square miles or so throughout the targeted coal measure, which in the case of Dart, extends from Oswestry, through East Wrexham and Holt, right up to East Chester.
So why are you not giving this information here and now. You say you have nothing to hide but you fail to give the full picture. This is likely because once local residents know the full extent of Dart`s plans, they are VERY likely to oppose your plans, so you only tell people what you want them to know and what you think cannot put your plans in jeopardy. Drilling horizontally in every direction from well pads situated every couple of square miles will mean drilling under nearly every community in the area. THAT is likely going to make many people very nervous as property prices plummet due to your activities. Not to mention all the other impacts I have listed before on this thread, none of which you have addressed other than to suggest they are mere `sound-bites`.

As for shale gas and fracking. Fracking a horizontal well within a shale gas play is NOT a standard industry procedure. To my knowledge, there has only been one such well that has been drilled and fracked in the UK.
Talk about `sound-bites` and misleading the public.
And as far as the Water industry, "Water companies have raised fears over the environmental impact and danger to the water supply of ‘fracking’ as the Government announced the world's ‘most generous’ tax relief regime for the industry today."
http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/markets/article-2370168/Water-firms-warn-fracking-danger-Osborne-unveils-generous-shale-gas-tax-breaks.html

Dangerous levels of radioactivity found at fracking waste site in Pennsylvania
Co-author of study says UK must impose better environmental regulation than US if it pursues shale gas extraction
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/oct/02/dangerous-radioactivity-fracking-waste-pennsylvania
As I was saying about self regulation, are you planning to dump all your flow-back waste water into the River Dee??
http://frack-off.org.uk/dart-dump-sepa-stumble/

I am very much looking forward to your public meeting.
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Re: Gas drilling plans near Common Wood, Borras Head, Wrexham
Posted By Douglas Bain
We at Dart Energy were approached by the administrator for the Holt Village website forum, asking if we had any comments to make. We are grateful for the opportunity to provide further clarification. Mr Ashley has clearly decided, as is his right, that he doesn’t want coal bed methane or shale development, and has put forward a lot of data and soundbites to support his view. We would be very happy to sit down and discuss our development directly with Mr Ashley, as there are a lot of confusing and sometimes conflicting statements. Mr Ashley seems to suggest that we say different things privately and public. That is absolutely untrue. We provide the same information to everyone, irrespective of whether they are natural supporters of our project or not. We have nothing to hide.

We are very happy to have a science based debate, because we believe we can drill for coal bed methane and shale safely, in a country with strong regulation. We have been drilling around the UK since 2004 and have actually drilled several wells in the area in the recent past.

So what are we planning to do?

We plan to drill a vertical well, to a depth of around 1000 metres, at land close to Borras Road, the well likely to be officially described as Holt-1. The entire activity from beginning to end will be less than 3 months, and drilling will take place for approximately 20 days in total. We have drilled around 20 wells like this in Scotland, England and Wales over the last 5 years. Around £250,000 will be spent locally within 30 miles of the well site. This well is being drilled to explore for coal bed methane, not shale. There will be no hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) of this CBM exploration well. If this exploration well confirms there is CBM potential, the next step will be to drill a pilot production well, which will require a fresh planning application, and again all stakeholders will have a chance to comment. Under this successful scenario, no fracking is anticipated: fracking is not considered a technical or commercially viable solution for thin European coals.


Shale
In the longer term, under a deal recently announced with GDF SUEZ, we aim to drill 3-4 shale exploration wells in Chester/Wrexham, the East Midlands and/or Yorkshire. We will have a better idea of precisely where possible drilling locations could be over the next 6 months. We would hope to drill these shale wells by the summer of 2016 subject to approvals. It is possible that these wells will use fracking techniques. Fracking is a standard industrial process, that has been used in the oil and gas industry for a long time. We are confident that the environmental and other risks can be mitigated through the current regulatory processes. Recent or pending publications by Public Health England https://www.gov.uk/government/news/shale-gas-extraction-emissions-are-a-low-risk-to-public-health and the Water industry http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-24880452 should provide some further comfort at this stage. To be clear, no fracking and drilling will take place until a rigorous environmental and technical assessment has been carried out, and any such application will be put through the planning process just like any other development. We will carry out consultations on our shale plans when we have determined the next steps.

We are currently finalising plans to provide a walk-in community meeting area where interested parties can meet some of our staff, and ask questions about the planning application. We will provide further information on this, but hope we get the opportunity to meet with you before the end of November.

Regards

Douglas Bain
UK Country Manager
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Re: Gas drilling plans near Common Wood, Borras Head, Wrexham
Posted By Luke Ashley
Read and educate yourselves on just how complex this web of climate deceit is at the heart of our government.
http://www.wdm.org.uk/sites/default/files/Carbon%20Capital%20Media%20Briefing5.pdf
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Re: Gas drilling plans near Common Wood, Borras Head, Wrexham
Posted By Luke Ashley
It is not generally known, but legislation under the 1972 Local Government Act already makes allowances for the holding of local referendums in the United Kingdom. Until relatively recently, this measure has been little used, but now an increasing number of local communities are starting to make use of it. What's more it is relatively easy for ordinary voters to set up a local referendum and although at present the result is only be advisory, it does nonetheless serve to let the authorities know just what local people feel on an issue. Below is an outline of the steps involved.

Choose an Issue over which people in your area feel strongly. The boundaries of "your area" are those governed by your local Parish Council (England), or Community Council (Wales). Unfortunately provisions do not exist for similar procedures in Scotland or Ulster.
Six voters on the Electoral Register for that Parish (available for viewing at local Post Office) now need to sign a piece of paper calling for a Public Parish meeting on a specified date more than seven clear working days hence. This 'notice of meeting' should specify date, time (after 6.00pm), venue, the names of the six, and the business to be transacted at the meeting (ie to call for a referendum on your chosen question). As a minimum the notice should be pinned up at one prominent site in the area.
Notify the Parish Council and the Chairman of the District Council of what you are doing. Tell them that you are acting under Part 3, schedule 12, paragraph 18, subparagraphs 4 and 5 of the Local Government Act 1972. You may well find that if your chosen issue arouses strong feelings locally, the Parish Council will come on board to help with the organisation of the meeting.
For the meeting to be valid, you will need at least ten local voters present. The meeting may be chaired by the Chairman of the Parish council if willing, but this is not essential, as anyone chosen by the meeting can chair it. Whatever else happens at the meeting, you will need to propose a motion calling for a referendum (Parish Poll) on your chosen question or questions. If one third of those voters present, or ten of those present, whichever figure is smaller, call for a referendum, then your District Council is obliged by law to hold one. Note this means that it is actually possible to loose a vote at the meeting, but still satisfy the requirements for calling a referendum.
Go to your District Council and tell them the outcome of the vote at the meeting. Quote the relevant legislation again. They now have between 14 and 25 days to hold the referendum.
You will be notified of the date of the referendum (Parish Poll). Voters will not receive Poll cards, nor will postal or proxy voting be allowed, but in other respects the poll will be carried out by the council's returning officer just as in an election. Liase with the returning officer in advance if you wish to attend the count.
It is now up to you to publicise the referendum, as the District Council is only obliged to display the minimum notices required in law. Are you going to put up posters, or to leaflet the area? One thing you should certainly do, and that is to talk to the local press, as this will make a good story for them.
After the result is announced, you can again use the media to obtain maximum publicity for the outcome, should it have been the one you desired! Local referendums as mentioned earlier are only advisory in the UK at present, but even so it would be a very bold council which decided to go against the strongly held wishes of its local electorate.
Further information on holding local referendums can be obtained from publications produced by The National Association of local Councils, 108 Great Russell Street, London, WC1B 3LD. Tel: 0207 637 1865
http://www2.prestel.co.uk/rodmell/local.htm
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Re: Gas drilling plans near Common Wood, Borras Head, Wrexham
Posted By Luke Ashley
The oil and gas industry are the same no matter which country they are in. They will use the same tactics to try and pull the wool over the eyes of Council leaders and the general public. Their primary objective is profit for them and their investors.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/02/frack-check-video-debunks_n_4184471.html
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Re: Gas drilling plans near Common Wood, Borras Head, Wrexham
Posted By Luke Ashley
Produced Water
To get methane out of coal seams the groundwater trapping the methane must be continually pumped out. The water contains a cocktail of chemicals including carcinogenic hydrocarbons such as benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene and heavy metals such as arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury. In Australia 10% of coal bed methane wells are hydraulically fractured to increase the flow of water and gas.

Water Disposal
Millions of litres of produced water has to be disposed of from each well. Over time this represents a huge volume of water and toxic material released into rivers, estuaries and the sea. In most cases the industry claims that the water does not require treatment or detailed monitoring. Picture shows a “designated outfall” taking untreated water from a CBM site at Airth, Scotland into the Firth of Forth.

Lowering of Water Table
Continuous removal of water from coal seams depletes ground water and may eventually lower farmers boreholes and surface water flows (streams and rivers). It can also change the flow of groundwater drawing fresh water into the coal seams. Lowering the water table has allowed methane and other gases to be released indiscriminately in Australia.

Air Pollution & Flaring
Methane, hydrogen sulphide, nitrogen oxides (Nox) and other aromatic hydrocarbons are emitted from sites. Noise pollution and further emissions of methane and airborne pollutants occur as the gas is processed and pressurised in sprawling temporary infrastructure. Flare stacks burn off unwanted gasses and cause noise and light pollution and more toxic emissions.

Methane Migration into Aquifers
The Coal Bed Methane (CBM) process along with hydraulic fracturing is designed to extract methane from coal seams. The gas wells themselves are the most common pathway for methane migration (leakage). This can lead to high levels of methane in streams, aquifers and eventually drinking water. Methane is 100x worse (on a 20 year time frame) than carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas. Picture shows the Condamine river in Queensland bubbling with gas.

Leaking Wells
6% of gas wells leak immediately and 50% of all gas wells leak within 15 years. CBM exploration requires many thousands of wells to be drilled. These wells can never be removed or recycled, the steel and concrete structures plunged deep into the geology will decay slowly over time. All gas wells will leak eventually.

Sites & Enclosure
Many wells require many sites which in turn require access roads, foundations, floodlights and enclosures. This pattern of development divides countryside, threatens rights of way and damages and slowly destroys the natural beauty and diversity of an area. Picture shows site at Airth near Falkirk, Scotland.

Pipelines
Pipelines will inevitably be used by the industry to transport gas. They create the additional danger of leaks and explosions. Pipelines may also be used to transport waste water to processing plants and there is already evidence of these leaking. Pipeline construction cuts scars across the countryside and blights surrounding areas with planning restrictions.

Compressor Stations & Flaring
A sprawling temporary gas infrastructure is needed to connect thousands of sites across the landscape. Flare stacks burn off unwanted gasses on every site and cause noise/light pollution and toxic emissions. Noise pollution and further emissions of methane and airborne pollutants occur as the gas is processed and pressurised.

Industrialise Countryside
The result of this type of industrial development on the countryside is catastrophic. Wildlife corridors are disrupted. Edge effects created by the cutting up of habitats into smaller and smaller pieces threaten biodiversity and the release and distribution of toxic compounds adds to the cumulative impact.

Corporate Profits vs Community Costs
If this industry is allowed to get a foot in the door in the UK the number of communities under threat will increases massively. The impacts and dangers are acute and borne by local communities who find themselves living in a gasfield. The rewards go to an elite of shareholders, directors and investors. Stopping this industry in the UK will send a clear message to other countries that the impacts and dangers are unaceptable.

Subsidence & Underground Coal Fires
As the water table is dropped by continuous pumping of water the geology can experience subsidence. This subsidence can damage homes, roads and other infrastructure including the wells and sites themselves. Once coal seams are dewatered it is possible for the coal to burn underground. All that is required is a point of ignition and an air source.

More Coal Extraction
Coal is the dirtiest of the fossil fuels and 70% of UK coal is considered un-mineable. Companies are already speculating that once coal seams are de-watered and degassed the coal can be extracted using other techniques. Open cast mining or burning the coal in situ (Underground Coal Gasification) will increase our use of coal and have devastating impacts for our land and climate.

Damage to Existing Industries
Farming and food production, recreation and tourism suffer at all stages of coal bed methane exploration, production and legacy. An areas reputation and landbase are exposed to long term dangers that exist long after the industry has gone.

Boom & Bust
Many areas of the country bear the scars of previous industrial development. Extractive industries destroy long term sustainable jobs and create unsustainable booms and busts. Any short term gains are far outweighed by the long term losses and resulting regional instability.

Heavy Vehicle Traffic
Just removing drilling mud and waste from wells will require many tanker/truck movements for each site . This is in addition to construction vehicles and drilling and fracking equipment when the site is commissioned. Because the lifetime of each CBM well is short (2-5 years) this armada of heavy vehicles will roll across the countryside.

Road Damage, Subsidence & Earthquakes
Road damage is an inevitable consequence of CBM exploration due to intensive transportation of materials and machinery. Subsidence and earthquakes may be caused by the process and are quite common in conventional coal mining.

Property Blight
Home owners in CBM extraction areas can find themselves trapped in a house they can not sell, re-mortgage, insure or develop. An area already suffering from a decline in existing industries is further impacted by industrialisation (sites & pipelines), air and water pollution and the resultant health impacts.

Direct Threat to Renewable Energy Investment
Further investment in fossil fuel extraction and a new wave of extreme energy undermines investment in energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. It perpetuates our dependence on finite resources and sabotages the life chances of future generations.

Climate Change
CBM will not replace other fossil fuels, it will be burned in addition to the oil, coal and gas that has already been discovered. By developing these new energy extraction techniques we are expanding global reserves of hydrocarbons and increasing emissions. The chemistry of the atmosphere is changing and due to drought, flood and starvation the death toll already stands at 450,000 annually.
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Re: Gas drilling plans near Common Wood, Borras Head, Wrexham
Posted By Luke Ashley
Water Use
A single frack uses 5-10 Olympic size swimming pools of water. The fracking industry removes water from the water cycle and turns clean water into polluted water that must be treated and disposed of. In the US, water auctions see farmers bidding against the oil and gas industry for water. Picture shows a tanker filling up from a standpipe in a residential area that already suffers from low water pressure at Banks, Lancashire.

Water Pollution
Large volumes of water are returned to the surface. Known as produced water it is contaminated with chemicals used in the fracking process and materials leached from the shale rock including heavy metals and radioactive elements. Additional pollution of aquifers and surface water is caused by methane migration, leaking wells, spills and accidents. Picture shows tanks of radioactive produced water at Preese Hall, Lancashire.

Fugitive Emissions
Shale Gas extraction inevitably leads to methane being emitted (leaked) directly into the atmosphere. Methane is 100x worse (on 20yr time frame) than carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas. Research shows that this makes Shale Gas more polluting than coal.

Air Pollution
A wide variety of dangerous pollutants, including ozone, aromatic hydrocarbons and silica dust are produced by the drilling and fracking process. The ozone levels in previously pristine areas are now higher than central Los Angeles. Additional air pollution is created by construction work, drill rigs and machinery. There is a growing catalog of human and animal health impacts associated with this industrial activity. Picture shows emissions from a condensate tank taken with an infrared camera.

Methane Migration into Aquifers
Hydraulic Fracturing is designed to extract methane from shale rock and inevitably disrupts the geology of an area. The gas wells themselves are the most common pathway for methane migration (leakage). This can lead to high levels of methane in streams, aquifers and eventually drinking water. Methane build up in enclosed spaces (such as buildings) results in the threat of explosions.

Leaking Wells
Industry reports show that 6% of gas wells leak immediately and 50% of all gas wells leak within 15 years. Shale gas exploration requires many wells to be drilled (800 planned for Lancashire alone). These wells can never be removed or recycled, the steel and concrete structures plunged deep into the geology decay slowly over time. All gas wells will leak eventually.

Sites & Enclosures
Many wells require many sites which in turn require access roads, foundations, floodlights and enclosures. This pattern of development divides countryside, threatens rights of way and damages and slowly destroys the natural beauty and diversity of an area. Picture shows site at Preese Hall, Lancashire.

Pipelines
Pipelines will inevitably be used by the industry to transport gas. They create the additional danger of leaks and explosions. Pipelines may also be used to transport waste water to processing plants and there is already evidence of these leaking. Pipeline construction cuts scars across the countryside and blights surrounding areas with planning restrictions.

Compressor Stations & Flaring
A sprawling temporary gas infrastructure is needed to connect thousands of sites across the landscape. Flare stacks burn off unwanted gasses on every site and cause noise/light pollution and toxic emissions. Noise pollution and further emissions of methane and airborne pollutants occur as the gas is processed and pressurised.

Industrialised Countryside
The result of this type of industrial development on the countryside is catastrophic. Wildlife corridors are disrupted. Edge effects created by the cutting up of habitats into smaller and smaller pieces threaten biodiversity and the release and distribution of toxic compounds adds to the cumulative impact.

Corporate Profit vs Community Cost
The more the oil and gas industry invest in drilling and fracking equipment the more drilling and fracking will happen. The impacts and dangers are acute and borne by local communities who find themselves living in gasfields. The rewards go to an elite of shareholders, directors and investors. Stopping this industry in the UK will send a clear message to other countries that the impacts and dangers are unaceptable.

Dangerous Work Environments
The jobs created by the fracking industry are small in number for the size of the investment. Local job creation is short term, unskilled and in high risk areas/occupations. These workers are at increased risk of industrial disease and accidents. Exposure to chemicals and produced water creates acute health risks for workers. The large volumes of sand (silica) used in the fracking process is causing a dramatic rise in cases of silicosis (lung disease) in the US.

Toxic Support Industries (Chemicals, Sand and Waste)
Fracking requires large volumes of sand and chemicals and produces large volumes of drilling waste and effluent that must be treated. Areas that have no drilling are still threatened by accidents, emissions and spills from these toxic support industries. Picture shows a fire at Magnablend (fracturing & drilling fluid manufacturer), Waxahachie, Texas.

Damage to existing industries
Farming and food production, recreation and tourism suffer at all stages of shale gas exploration, production and legacy. An areas reputation, population and landbase are exposed to long term damage that exists long after the shale industry has gone.

Boom & Bust
Many areas of the country bear the scars of previous industrial development. Extractive industries destroy long term sustainable jobs and create unsustainable booms and busts. Any short term gains are far outweighed by the long term losses and resulting regional instability.

Heavy Vehicle Traffic
Just bringing water to site requires 1,000 – 4,000 tanker movements per frack. With 10 wells per site and 80 sites planned in Lancashire alone this would require millions of tanker movements. Because the lifetime of each shale well is short (2-5 years) this armada of heavy vehicles will roll across the countryside.

Road Damage, Subsidence & Earthquakes
Road damage is an inevitable consequence of shale exploration due to intensive transportation of materials and machinery. Subsidence may occur and the earthquakes caused by the first use of hydraulic fracturing in Lancashire were sufficiently powerful to distorted the companies own steel and concrete well which is now unusable.

Property Blight
Home owners in fracking zones can find themselves trapped in a house they can not sell, re-mortgage, insure or develop. An area already suffering from a decline in existing industries is further impacted by industrialisation (sites, pipelines, flare stacks), air and water pollution and the resultant health impacts.

Direct Threat to Renewable Energy Investment
Further investment in fossil fuel extraction and a new wave of extreme energy undermines investment in energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. It perpetuates our dependence on finite resources and sabotages the life chances of future generations.

Climate Change
Shale Gas and Oil will not replace other fossil fuels, it will be burned in addition to the oil, coal and gas that has already been discovered. By developing these new energy extraction techniques we are expanding global reserves of hydrocarbons and increasing emissions. The chemistry of the atmosphere is changing and due to drought, flood and starvation the death toll already stands at 450,000 annually.
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Re: Gas drilling plans near Common Wood, Borras Head, Wrexham
Posted By Luke Ashley
Sorry I missed that meeting. I was late getting in from work, but a friend of mine went in my place. That friend was waiting outside before being invited into the meeting. The three reps were also waiting outside and got chatting to my friend not knowing he was against the industry. They told him things that they deliberately omitted during the meeting. Because of this, my friend and I will be asking for a meeting with Holt Councillors in the very near future to inform them of what was NOT said in the meeting and to warn them of what the future holds should should full scale gas extraction be allowed down the line. They have plans to re-enter the well at the proposed exploration drill site to drill a further 1000 metres and to drill further wells every square mile or so. This is common practice for CBM extraction and fracking is also very likely to take place. The reason for them to drill to a depth of 2000 Metres or so is to target the Bowland Shale Hodder. They have stated on their website they have both shale gas and CBM interests within their North East Wales licenses.
In light of the answer Dart gave during the meeting with regard to people refusing permission to allow them onto their land and the answer they gave as being "All we would have to do is go to court and get a compulsory purchase order" , I strongly advise every single member of the Holt community be properly informed of the impacts and consequences before accepting Dart onto their land. If people DO get themselves properly informed, I am in no doubt they will do what they can to refuse permission. I feel that EVERYBODY should be made aware of Dart`s future plans and that a local referendum should be held.
It is not generally known, but legislation under the 1972 Local Government Act already makes allowances for the holding of local referendums in the United Kingdom. Until relatively recently, this measure has been little used, but now an increasing number of local communities are starting to make use of it. What's more it is relatively easy for ordinary voters to set up a local referendum and although at present the result is only be advisory, it does nonetheless serve to let the authorities know just what local people feel on an issue.
In answer to your question regarding which area of land Dart will be looking at in the future, as I cannot post pictures in this forum, please take a look at this link on my Facebook page,
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=549447151801122&set=pb.127538580658650.-2207520000.1383477184.&type=3&theater
The area they will be targeting is the area marked `Good UCG area` which is in pink.
I will now list some impacts of shale gas and CBM extraction in the following posts.
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Re: Gas drilling plans near Common Wood, Borras Head, Wrexham
Posted By Robert Campbell
Looks like there are a lot of questions to be asked Luke. I see that representatives from Dart Energy are going to be be attending Holt Community Council meeting next Tueday night. Would you happen to know which land is being looked at around here?
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Changes to Policing
Posted By Robert Campbell
Do you feel that the level of police support in the community is appropriate?
What are your experiences of the police (positive or negative)?
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Dawson
Posted By patricia ann blackshaw
Are there any families called Dawson in your village? I visited Holt last year and really liked the place. Some of my ancestors were born there many years ago and was wondering if I may have any distant relative living there now?
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Traffic problems along The Gardens
Posted By Robert Campbell
Do you think that the Gardens should have traffic restrictions and that residents should have first priority to park outside their own homes?
Provide your feedback here.
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Parking on The Cross
Posted By Robert Campbell
What to residents feel about parking and traffic on The Cross? Post your views here.
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Should Wrexham bid for City status?
Posted By Robert Campbell
Residents throughout Wrexham are being encouraged to let Wrexham Council know whether they believe Wrexham should put itself forward in the competition for City Status which will be awarded to one town in the UK in celebration of the Queen's Diamond Jubilee in 2012.

Information is now available on Wrexham Council's website (www.wrexham.gov.uk/citystatus)to give residents information regarding the reasons for putting forward a bid and to answer some of the questions raised regarding the implications for Wrexham if a bid is successful.

What do the people of Holt think?
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Remembrance Sunday Traffic
Posted By Robert Campbell
During the service on the Cross on Sunday, the Police seemed to be having difficulty getting traffic to stop and some people kept their engines running.
I know there are 4 roads that lead into the Cross but would it be possible to have signs put in place a few days before the service warning of a short closure and asking drivers to switch off their engines for 2 minutes? Could the signs then be used to actually block the roads?
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Manure
Posted By Robert Campbell
Does anyone know where I can get some farm manure for my garden?
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Proposed Badger Cull
Posted By Robert Campbell
With the announcement that the Assembly Government plans to carry out a public consultation on culling badgers, what is the local view of people in the community? The news item on the front page gives information on the proposal.
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Re: Proposed Badger Cull
Posted By 1314
I think this applies mostly to South West Wales and not us.
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'Stensons' - Holt
Posted By Robert Campbell
It's Done,
We've shut,
No booze,
Tut-tut.

No ciggies,
No sweets,
No friends
to greet.

Retired now,
Worn out,
Another book,
Without doubt!

This time,
One chapter all,
Strokes pulled,
Had a ball.

Thank you all,
Thank you friends,
A new beginning
But a happy end.

Thank you from
Mike and Barbara S.
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Dust in the village
Posted By Robert Campbell
I do appreciate that someone is keeping Holt Village clean and yes it does look tidy.

But when you can't walk in the village because of the dust then it is a bit different.

Last Saturday I went to Holt, and there was a man there cleaning the village gutters with which I thought was with a blower for blowing leaves, so the dust was going everywhere.

Last evening about 5.15pm my husband and I went for a walk after work to get some fresh air, and there in the village again was the same man at the Cross with his blower, well it really
isn't good, dust was going everywhere (I actually thought it may have been dust from the vulcano) all over the cars etc, If older people or someone with asthma were out in it I am quite sure
it would affect them badly.

It certainly wasn't the fresh air I was expecting.

Could this be looked into as a matter of urgency.

EE - 16/04/10
Copy of letter from resident sent to Wrexham Council
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Holt Pageant
Posted By Robert Campbell
Message from James Addy, Commanding Officer
Earl of Essex Regiment of Foote

Hi there,

I wanted to say from the English Civil War Society, the Earl of Essex Regiment of Foote (and all the other Regiments that were there), and from
myself a very big thankyou for inviting us to be part of the event. We would be very interested in a repeat visit at some point in the future, or
to somewhere in the local area.

All of the members really enjoyed themselves as the event location had an idyllic charm that means we just like to be there, and the Holt village
community were fantastic and very welcoming, and it made it quite special that a few of younger adults stayed with us for some time through the day,
into the evening - it was great that they were enjoying learning how to weave with the trollen wheel and weaving peg loom (both producing products
that they were able to take away with them). In fact they were so much part of the group, that they enjoyed some of our authentically cooked food
in the evening.

Many of the members (including my wife and I) also realised that the Holt Castle compound was bountiful in ripe fruits etc, and we went away with
containers full of Walnuts (which have been hulled and are drying), Sloe's (Already fermenting into Sloe Gin on a shelf at home), Damson's (Already
turned into Damson fruit leather and Damson jam), Crab Apples, and Cooking Apples (which are to be turned into Dried Apple Rings).

So glad everybody had a great time, and I hope to hear from you soon.
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Count Your Blessings
Posted By Bob Park
One Friday evening, what with one thing costing a bit more here and a bit more there, poor old Mrs Jones was worried as to how she was to get over the week-end until her widow’s pension arrived on Tuesday.

Then came Saturday morning and to her surprise, a letter dropped into her lobby. There was no identification as to who sent it. But to old Mrs Jones, it might well have fallen from heaven itself, for in it were two £10 notes.

Need I say how the sun shone for Mrs Jones when she did her shopping in the morning, or how she carried gratitude in her heart for her unknown helper.
Bob & Anne Park.
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Holt Nomads season 2009/2010
Posted By markh7
If you are interested in watching some quality football (sometimes!) for free and getting some fresh air, read on.

Holt Nomads start their season on Sat 15th August 2pm Kickoff at home (pitch opposite Bellis') vs Glyn Ceiriog.

All fixtures, results and reviews are posted on the Welsh National League website :

http://wnl.org.uk
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Count Your Blessings
Posted By Bob Park
FORREST GUMP GOES TO HEAVEN

The day finally arrived. Forrest Gump dies and goes to Heaven.He is at the Pearly Gates, met by St. Peter himself. However, the gates are closed,
and Forrest approaches the gatekeeper.

St. Peter said, 'Well, Forrest, it is certainly good to see you. We have heard a lot about you. I must tell you, though, that the place is filling up fast, and we have been administering an entrance examination for everyone. The test is short, but you have to pass it before you can get into Heaven.'

Forrest responds, 'It sure is good to be here, St. Peter, sir. But nobody ever told me about any entrance exam.. I sure hope that the test ain't too hard. Life was a big enough test as it was.'

St. Peter continued, 'Yes, I know, Forrest, but the test is only three questions.

First:
What two days of the week begin with the letter T?

Second:
How many seconds are there in a year?

Third:
What is God's first name?'

Forrest leaves to think the questions over. He returns the next day and sees St. Peter, who waves him up, and says, 'Now that you have had a chance to think the questions over, tell me your answers.'

Forrest replied, 'Well, the first one - which two days in the week begins with the letter 'T'? Shucks, that one is easy. That would be Today and Tomorrow.'

The Saint's eyes opened wide and he exclaimed, 'Forrest, that is not what I was thinking, but you do have a point, and I guess I did not specify, so I will give you credit
for that answer. How about the next one?' asked St. Peter?

'How many seconds in a year? Now that one is harder,' replied Forrest, 'but I thunk and thunk about that, and I guess the only answer can be twelve.'

Astounded, St.. Peter said, 'Twelve? Twelve? Forrest, how in Heaven's name could you come up with twelve seconds in a year?'

Forrest replied, 'Shucks, there's got to be twelve: January 2nd, February 2nd, March 2nd... '

'Hold it,' interrupts St. Peter. 'I see where you are going with this, and I see your point,
though that was not quite what I had in mind....but I will have to give you credit for that one, too. Let us go on with the third and final question. Can you tell me God's first name'?
'Sure,' Forrest replied, 'it's Andy.' 'Andy?' exclaimed an exasperated and frustrated St Peter. 'Ok, I can understand how you came up with your answers to my first two questions, but just how in the world did you come up with the name Andy as the first name of God?'

'Shucks, that was the easiest one of all,' Forrest replied. 'I learnt it from the song,
ANDY WALKS WITH ME,
ANDY TALKS WITH ME,
ANDY HE TELLS ME I AM HIS OWN.'

St. Peter opened the Pearly Gates, and said: 'Run, Forrest, run.'

---------------------------------------------

Lord, give me a sense of humour
Give me the ability to understand a clean joke,
To get some humour out of life,
And to pass it on to other folks!

Bob Park.
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Count Your Blessings
Posted By Bob Park
I was observing my little grand-daughter as she sat drawing. I happened to ask, what the drawing was, she replied. 'I'm drawing God.' I paused for a second and said, 'But no one knows what God looks like pet.' Without missing a beat, or looking up from her drawing, she replied, ‘ They will in a minute.'
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Count Your Blessings
Posted By Bob Park
What’s good about Good Friday you may ask?
It represents sadness and sorrow, pain and suffering, death and desertion.
Ah! But Sunday’s on its way.

Bob and Anne Park.
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Count Your Blessings
Posted By Bob Park
Anne and I were returning from one of our many visits to Romania where we had supervised the building of an Accident and Emergency Department for the local run down hospital in the small town of Sighisoara.

A male passenger on the plane in casual conversation with one of our volunteer fieldworkers enquired about his visit to Romania. Our fieldworker explained how he had visited a large rundown hospital where the patients were suffering and even dying for want of life’s basics. He went on to explain how the hospital struggled without even a packet of washing powder to clean the bed clothes.

The passenger looked somewhat surprised and asked our fieldworker if he knew who he was to which the fieldworker replied, No, why should I?

The passenger was a Manager with Persil Soap Powder U.K. and as a result our run down hospital in Romania received Persil for years to come.

Bob and Anne Park.
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Dog Poo
Posted By TERRY EATON
I welcome this article and agree that this issue has become more of a problem quite recently. Maybe additional pets for Christmas. However I would like to extend this issue beyond the pavements to all footpaths surrounding our village. The path behind the school field is always littered with puppy's deposits.
This problem is just as bad as the litter left by some human residents. It does not take much effort to clean up behind us.
It is my opinion, if we can not leave this earth a better place for our presence on it we should at least leave it as we find it.
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Re: Dog Poo
Posted By ray mitchell
had the most enjoyable week working with wrexham museum on the archeological dig at the castle .but this was over shadowed by the way the locals just treat this area for one thing ...and that is to use it as their pets toilet !!! quite a few dog walkers have gone past this week as we have been working and just letting their dogs squat and do their business then walk off leaving a steaming turd for someone to tread in. Farndon primary school paid us a visit on thursday to see how things we're progressing .hopefully none of them trod in it .and to the dog walkers of holt that just use the castle area as a glorified dog toilet SHAME ON YOU !!!!
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Re: Dog Poo
Posted By Robert Campbell
This has been a problem for many years. There is an article on this website under the INFO tab then 'Village Issues' which gives some guidance. It's all down to irresponsible dog owners.
With regard to 'where to put it,' I think that the poo can be put in the normal waste bins around the village. However, I will ask the Clerk to the Council, Jean Pierce, to look at this forum and advise.
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Re: Dog Poo
Posted By Sian Newman
I have never lived any where before without dog bins! How do we go about getting these placed on popular walking sites? I'm a bit fed up of walking about with little black bags !
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Be proud of your village, PLEASE pick up your dog poo
Posted By Robert Campbell
Holt is apparently once again entering the Calor Gas Village of the Year award this year, having come close to winning a few years ago. Personally, I’d be embarrassed to welcome the judges to the village at the moment, for fear of them leaving with more than just a good impression – with dog mess on their shoes as well.

I don’t know why the amount of dog mess on our pavements (and walls – urgh) has dramatically increased lately – maybe once one person leaves it, everyone else thinks it’s ok to do so too, but to be frank, it’s disgusting. What’s worse is that residents think so little of our village that they make no effort to clear it up and have no pride in how their village looks. For some reason Farndon doesn’t seem to have the same problem…

I am a dog owner and regularly pound the pavements giving him some exercise but if he ever makes a mess I pick it up. Unfortunately it’s getting harder and harder to negotiate the piles of steaming muck without getting some on my shoes, the dog’s paws, my toddler’s wellies, or worst of all, my pram wheels. Almost daily I get back from a walk and have to hose off the pram, trying not to think of the health risks to my toddler and five month old baby.

I love Holt, I love the people and I love living here – PLEASE, PLEASE be proud of your village and pick up the poo. It’s not much to ask and it could really improve the daily quality of life of those of us who are out walking regularly. I have contacted the council to ask for dog mess bins which should hopefully encourage people to dispose of it properly and there’s no excuse for not buying bags when nappy sacks are something like 17p for 100 at Tesco. So come on residents of Holt, don’t be lazy and inconsiderate, pick up the poo.
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Re: Be proud of your village, PLEASE pick up your dog poo
Posted By Mrs Wendy Thelwell
I am so pleased that this subject has been brought up as it has been a bone of contention for ages. We live on Castle Street and the dog poo on the pavement is now so bad that my boys have to wear their wellies rain or shine to head off into the village as I just can't face having to wash their shoes or trainers every time they venture out. I even use an old buggy to take my toddler down to The Cross as there is the horrible issue of having to get the housepipe out to clean the wheels every time we get back. I am sure all the dog poo on the pavements must pose a health risk and it is just not acceptable. Dog owners in the village must be more responsible and less selfish. I agree that the only answer is for the Council to provide dog poo bins and there don't appear to be any in Holt which is surprising. My mother who lives in Farndon had a similar problem some years ago as she has a public footpath down her lane and it is a popular route for dog walkers. The Council eventually agreed to provide a bin and now the lane is clean and much more pleasant so I know that these bins do make a difference.
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Count Your Blessings
Posted By Bob Park
Few would disagree that these are difficult times we live in, especially for the elderly. Problem is, focusing solely on the negative only makes things worse whilst counting our blessings can make us feel better.

Anne and I recently moved into the best little house we’ve ever had. It’s on the outskirts of the beautiful village of Holt and the locals have proved to be lovely welcoming folk.
Having resided in some twenty different locations during our 49 years of marriage we thank the good Lord for bringing us to this lovely corner of His Kingdom.

Everyone has something to be thankful for so why not share it here on holtvillage.co.uk?

Bob and Anne Park
3 Border Cottages,
Wrexham Road,
Holt.
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Re: Count Your Blessings
Posted By Mike Davison
What a lovely sentiment. It is wonderful that you should feel so at home.

Mike Davison
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broadband speed
Posted By 88
I use talktalk as my isp and for 12 months they have been promising an improvement in speed from just 1 meg can anyone do better than this?
or what are the other isps achieving
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Re: broadband speed
Posted By markh7
Modified:
In Holt we should be able to get approx 5 Mbps. You can key your home phone number in on the BT website (copy & paste this into your browser without any spaces)
http://www.productsandservices.bt.com/consumerProducts/
displayTopic.do?topicId=25795&s_cid=con_FURL_broadband/speedtest

I signed up for 2Meg with BT and I definitely achieve that. Recently I think they upgraded me again free of charge because I'm sure I got 5Meg on one particular download.

The servers (e.g. microsoft) you are getting the data from often have their own transfer limits so sometimes you get much less than the theoretical anyway.
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Traffic on the Cross
Posted By Robert Campbell
Traffic around the Cross just seems to get worse. The areas that have been hatched for no parking are just ignored and the width of the roads are just big enough for one car to pass through.
I am not sure if this creates a safety hazzard or if reduces the speeds so much that it improves things.
Do we need a one way system around it?
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Re: Traffic on the Cross
Posted By Eleanor Wynn
I personally think that a one way system would confuse matters and would have absolutely no impact on the amount of traffic parking around that area. The only way to reduce parking is to put down double yellow lines, but then you have the problem of enforcing those. Only yesterday, whilst waiting for the bus into Wrexham I observed a gentleman park next to the bus shelter on the Cross, and then proceed to walk to that bus stop - only to get onto the bus into Chester, presumably because he didn't want to pay to park, and was able to get the bus for free due to his free bus pass from being a OAP!! Holt is turning into a giant park and ride! Can we all buy a traffic cone each and place them around the Cross, lol!
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What a mess
Posted By Robert Campbell
I am becoming increasingly concerned about the litter and broken glass on the Cross at the weekends. What can be done about this?
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Calor Gas Village of the Year Contest
Posted By Mike Davison
The year before last we entered the village into the above competition and came in as one of the runners up for North Wales. Not a bad result for a first effort. Think what could be acheived if we pulled together. If anyone is intersted in seeing if we could do a bit better this year I would be keen to hear from you via the website.

Mike Davison
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Entrance to School Lane,
Posted By Derek Tapp
When on earth are we going to get a street sign for School Lane, all deliverey vans have trouble finding residents living here,our post codes show it exists, Sat Nav takes drivers down Dee Side Lane,The sign reads leading to Castle Gardens,and should be replaced or added to with School Lane,and the dip as you enter is to steep, a recovery lorry damaged itself by dragging the trailor in the dip.
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Re: Calor Gas Village of the Year Contest
Posted By Robert Campbell
I think it is a great idea. I will drop you an e-mail through the website.
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